• Kenneth Gibson MSP

SNP Government Funds £400k Research to Develop New MND Treatments



Research to develop new treatments for Motor Neurone Disease (MND) has been announced by the SNP Government and the UK Dementia Research Institute at the University of Edinburgh.

Almost £400,000 will be invested over the next three years to fund two postdoctoral posts at the University.

The scientists will work in partnership with the Euan MacDonald Centre for MND Research, a Scotland wide research network.

Their work will look at chemical compounds that have the potential to be developed into drugs to treat MND. These would then go through a process that could include clinical trials to test their safety and effectiveness.

Health Secretary Shona Robison said:

“This partnership between the SNP Government’s Chief Scientist Office and the University of Edinburgh will allow us to build on our previous MND research funding, which includes a number of Ph.D Studentships totalling almost half a million pounds over five years.

“This continues the work we’ve done with a number of stakeholders in recent years. For example, not only did MND Scotland support us in the creation of these studentships, but we’ve worked with them to double the number of MND specialist nurses.

“We’re also working with The Neurological Alliance of Scotland, NHS boards, integration joint boards and those who live with neurological conditions on Scotland’s first National Action Plan on Neurological Conditions.”

Kenneth Gibson MSP added:

“Each year, around 200 people in Scotland are diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease, which is the beginning of a trying and devastating time for both the patient and their family and friends. My father’s sister, aunt Eileen, died of this dreadful disease.

“We want to ensure that people living with neurodegenerative conditions have access to the best possible care and support across the country and finding ways to develop better treatment forms a major part of this.

“I have no doubt that this investment will have a very positive impact and I am hopeful that the work of the two researchers will help to improve the odds for people suffering from MND.”

ENDS